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... y no se lo tragó la tierra

... y no se lo tragó la tierra

List Price: $7.95
Your Price: $7.16
Product Info Reviews

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Rating: 4 stars
Summary: A Review with a Claim
Review: -----Teachers all over America force their students to read many books to help them find self-identity in the awkward years before adulthood. Most students, for example, are forced to read Catcher in the Rye. This book recognizes issues that the white, urban, middle to upper class American youth goes through. Issues like sex, drugs, school, changes and overall life in the city. This book helps much of the youth, including myself, cope with growing up. It doesn't, however, cover the issue of segregation and poverty. These two topics are very common, and have a huge impact on much of the American youth. A book that does cover these topics, however, is one written by Tomas Rivera, entitled, And the Earth Did Not Devour Him. Tomas Rivera creates fictional short stories, from an adolescent's perspective, about real life issues for Mexican-Americans in the early to middle twentieth century. Though the stories are fiction, Rivera articulates truths about the struggles with issues like work, family, religion, poverty and segregation. Rivera has created a book that could greatly serve as a coping tool for youths that struggle with such issues. It should therefore, be brought into American school systems in order to allow students to identify with it as they mature into adults.
-----One of the short stories that pretty much discuss each of the issues including work, family, religion, poverty and segregation is, in fact, the one the book's named after, "And the Earth Did Not Devour Him." It covers not only work related issues like low pay, long hours, hot weather, unreasonable bosses, and young children working, but also poverty, family and religion. This story is about a poor family where almost all members have to help out and work. They all work on a plantation where, during the peak of summer, the sun starts to get to them and they drop like flies due to sunstroke. A young boy is witnessing this and is constantly expressing how he feels. He starts to question God. He wonders why God would do this to his kind, hard working family. He curses God and finally after doing so feels at peace. This story is one of the most powerful stories in the book. It is well written, covering many issues in only a matter of pages. Many children grow up and see their family work so hard without much to show for it. Because of this, many children blame God or question their religion. There is no answer to such frustration but this story can help be a tool to help cope with it. This is just one out of the many stories in this book that is meaningful in some aspect. Each represents a memory in a young boy's life that was important to him, in a good or bad way. Rivera effectively uses the child's memory as a way to jump from story to story. By doing this, the book doesn't get boring and he tackles many different issues.
-----This book definitely takes the role as a deconstruction literary style in the aspect that the stories can be taken more than one way. Readers could use them to cope, as a lesson, or just for entertainment. I, personally, found this book to be very moving, informative and entertaining. I became aware of how fortunate I am not to have to deal with such issues. With the deconstruction literary style in mind, I would definitely recommend this book to anyone of any age, especially a youth that has suffered from work, family, religion, poverty or segregation. Teachers should defiantly bring this book into their curriculum where it can be used to help cope with growing up or to learn about some of the struggles that many oppressed Americans, mostly Mexican Americans, went through and/or still go through.

Rating: 4 stars
Summary: A Review with a Claim
Review: -----Teachers all over America force their students to read many books to help them find self-identity in the awkward years before adulthood. Most students, for example, are forced to read Catcher in the Rye. This book recognizes issues that the white, urban, middle to upper class American youth goes through. Issues like sex, drugs, school, changes and overall life in the city. This book helps much of the youth, including myself, cope with growing up. It doesn't, however, cover the issue of segregation and poverty. These two topics are very common, and have a huge impact on much of the American youth. A book that does cover these topics, however, is one written by Tomas Rivera, entitled, And the Earth Did Not Devour Him. Tomas Rivera creates fictional short stories, from an adolescent's perspective, about real life issues for Mexican-Americans in the early to middle twentieth century. Though the stories are fiction, Rivera articulates truths about the struggles with issues like work, family, religion, poverty and segregation. Rivera has created a book that could greatly serve as a coping tool for youths that struggle with such issues. It should therefore, be brought into American school systems in order to allow students to identify with it as they mature into adults.
-----One of the short stories that pretty much discuss each of the issues including work, family, religion, poverty and segregation is, in fact, the one the book's named after, "And the Earth Did Not Devour Him." It covers not only work related issues like low pay, long hours, hot weather, unreasonable bosses, and young children working, but also poverty, family and religion. This story is about a poor family where almost all members have to help out and work. They all work on a plantation where, during the peak of summer, the sun starts to get to them and they drop like flies due to sunstroke. A young boy is witnessing this and is constantly expressing how he feels. He starts to question God. He wonders why God would do this to his kind, hard working family. He curses God and finally after doing so feels at peace. This story is one of the most powerful stories in the book. It is well written, covering many issues in only a matter of pages. Many children grow up and see their family work so hard without much to show for it. Because of this, many children blame God or question their religion. There is no answer to such frustration but this story can help be a tool to help cope with it. This is just one out of the many stories in this book that is meaningful in some aspect. Each represents a memory in a young boy's life that was important to him, in a good or bad way. Rivera effectively uses the child's memory as a way to jump from story to story. By doing this, the book doesn't get boring and he tackles many different issues.
-----This book definitely takes the role as a deconstruction literary style in the aspect that the stories can be taken more than one way. Readers could use them to cope, as a lesson, or just for entertainment. I, personally, found this book to be very moving, informative and entertaining. I became aware of how fortunate I am not to have to deal with such issues. With the deconstruction literary style in mind, I would definitely recommend this book to anyone of any age, especially a youth that has suffered from work, family, religion, poverty or segregation. Teachers should defiantly bring this book into their curriculum where it can be used to help cope with growing up or to learn about some of the struggles that many oppressed Americans, mostly Mexican Americans, went through and/or still go through.

Rating: 4 stars
Summary: Una historia sobre los emigrantes mexicanos en EEUU.
Review: Esta novela se trata de la vida de los emigrantes mexicanos en los Estados Unidos en el tiempo de la guerra de Corea.Es sobre la vida de un muchacho mexicano y su familia. El cuento se expresa en maneras distintas. Unas partes se cuentan a través del relato de las observasiones; unos sucesos en la manera de la tercera persona, y la mayoría de los capítulos aparentemente se describe por la lengua del muchacho emigrante. La percepción profunda del sufrimiento, el enfrentar con la enfermedad y la muerte son el sabor amargo del libro. También hay una película con el mismo título a base de la novela.

Rating: 5 stars
Summary: Compact and concentrated like Juan Rulfo's Llano en Llamas.
Review: I met Tomas Rivera in Houston, Texas in 1971, at a gathering in support of a political movement which was sweeping across the Southwest awaking Chicanos to action.

Since then I have read this book a half dozen times and still find it equal to the times when a voice long held to a whisper surfaced. And like Juan Rulfo's laconic and haunting voice of the forgotten campensino so is Tomas Rivera's voice of the migrant work of South Texas.

Rating: 4 stars
Summary: Good Work, Sloppy Translation
Review: I refer to the Arte Publico Press edition, translation by Evangelina-Vigil-Pinon. Rivera's sensitive, poignant and lyrical work really ought to have been copy-edited, if the translator speaks such poor English. It does no minority author any service to have his or her book filled with ignorant grammar mistakes--especially when those mistakes are not in the original Spanish.

I hope, if another edition is prepared, someone will purchase a third grade grammar and correct such embarrassing errors as the use of lay when the verb is lie, possessives, and plurals.

Rating: 4 stars
Summary: STRUGGLES A LATINO BOY FACES
Review: I thought this book of numerous documents of fiction was entertaining to read. Short story after short story each being totally different leaving the reader to wonder what this book is about. The main character which is a young boy all the stories which he went through together in the last story. Each individual story looks into many different issues that this young male latino faces like prejudices as an example and through his characters words the author, Thomas Rivera, infers an actual point that he is trying to get across. I would recommend this book to any person who is interested in a moving story of struggles a young latino faces which was interested from the original story written in Spanish called "... Y no se lo trago la tierra".

Rating: 4 stars
Summary: Interesting
Review: It's a little on the politically correct side, but it's a good read about a Mexican-American family's struggle to survive working in produce fields and the humiliation the main character faces in school and in life being a Mexican-American.

Rating: 5 stars
Summary: Sensitive, charming and thoughtful!
Review: Rivera's "No se lo trag la tierra" offers a sensitive portrayal of a year in the life of a Mexican-American boy. He weaves his story with intelligence, sensitivity and warmth. You will laugh and cry and you will think about this book for a long time after you put it down. I highly recommend it to English and Spanish speakers!

Rating: 5 stars
Summary: Excellant
Review: Some have suggested that introspection and analysis is the property of the genteel classes. Meaning: those who have the education, and time to do it.

Thomas Rivera's book proves otherwise.His stories sample the private thoughts of those who "have-not". I wonder how he accomplished it so beautifully and completely when I often can't articulate my own introspections just after thinking them.

I particularly enjoyed his 2 0r 3 sentence preview of the core idea of each chapter. An interesting device that whets your appetite, and prepares you for what he thought was the key to each short story.

Skip the introduction by Herminio Rios C. It sounds pretentious and uses elaborate literary terms to analyze some very simple stories. They stand by themselves just fine.

This book is not limited by ethnicity. It echoes the cry of anyone who has been alone, or who has struggled and lost. Anyone who has lost his faith, or been a stranger in a strange land will under! ! stand these stories.

By all means, read this book. quietly, reflectively, and in small "bites", so that you can fully appreciate this beautiful addition to American literature.

Rating: 4 stars
Summary: It's a good example of mexican culture
Review: This book is about how a boy grew up in a mexican culture. The struggles that he faces throught out his childhood . This book is about short stories that this young boy goes through and how impacted him. After reading the book you will be able to make the connections from each short story. Each story reflects how this boy is prejudge just by his etchnicity, how he tries to overcome and how important his parents are to him. This is probably a good example of experiences in which many people faced when coming to a different country. Not only mexicans but all the people around the world in general. It usually happens when you are trying to bring your own culture to a different land or country different from the one you used to live in. It has very good details in which you will be able to have a mind movie of the events that are happening through out the book. You will be able to understand it and picture it while reading it. While reading the book you can easily understand a little bit about mexican culture and how they try to get used to the new country and adjust. This book is available in spanish as well and if you are bilingual it will be a good book to read.


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